This week's question:What does the No-hitter mean to you? Also, where were you when the final out was recorded?Peter:
I was sitting stock still at my desk - toggling b/t Facebook and Twitter, making sure not to lean any more or less on my arms than i had already been doing...lest the Cards get a hit.  My right heel was arched, so all the weight was pushing on the ball of the foot.  The last two outs my leg was trembling.  My wife was on the couch holding her Blackberry, not that she was doing anything with it, all the messages had been checked - in the 7th I asked her to remain on the couch holding her phone.  After two outs I simply said "well, he's gone to a place no Met has ever gone".  On strike three we both lept up - I shoulted YES - and we hugged.  After I put her down, she got a bottle of champagne from the fridge and tried to get the heart rate down.  As a nice postscript, I called my biggest Met fan friend - a guy I went to games with in the lean years at old Shea, sitting in the upper deck with no one around.  He had been watching The Little Mermaid with his daughter.  Missed the whole thing.As for what this means, it's complicated - and maybe too soon to tell.  For starters, it means we never have to hear snide comments from fans of other teams.  They'll try with the Beltran line drive thing, but that'll run out of steam soon.  No hitters are a matter of luck - it was dumb luck the MEts had to wait so long for one, and it was luck that it finally arrived.  I mean really, that was far from Johan's best game he's ever throw in terms of stuff.  Seaver's no hitter was not in his top five games when he went into the HOF.What I really take away form the game are the good feelings.  It's been a long time since we have had reason to feel good about anything.  As a fan base, we may not have always agreed with one another, but we all hung in there.  We stood by the team, even when part of our brain said RUN.  We put up with being a punchline, with things not being right at the new stadium, with a front office that made unforced error after unforced error, with crowing from the other team in town, with the fucking Phillies.  Friday night was a sign that things are at long last moving in the right direction  as well as a glimpse as to what the near future can hold for this franchise.  It is also  a reminder to all of us that yes, as a fan base, one day our faith will be rewarded.  And it will be sweet.  Until that day..Ya Gotta Believe.
Paul Festa:
It means very little on a factual level - if the Mets won 8-7, it still would have been a win.  But it means a lot on an emotional level.  It's a huge boost for a fan base that hit rock bottom this offseason, while they watched a bona fide fiasco engulf the team's ownership.  There was little hope for anything this year, and 2012 just seemed like something we had to sit through in order to get to 2013.  The negativity was overwhelming coming into the season.  The team has played well during the first two months, but we've watched with the most cautious of optimism.The biggest positive (and there have been several) has been the near-miraculous comeback of Johan Santana.  He and his new shoulder have pitched better than anyone could have hoped.  In fairy tale style, it was Johan who appropriately pitched the team's first no hitter.  The fan base has something big and dramatic to hang their hat on, and the first real memory of something great happening at Citi Field (Gary Sheffield's 500th homer doesn't count).  It was a perfect way to shake off our dark cloud, at least for now.On an emotional level, it feels like a turning point for the franchise, even though, rationally, we know we still have 109 games left to play.  In any event, this is nothing but great for the team and their fans.As for where I was, sitting on my couch, watching the game on the MLB.tv app on my PS3, as usual.  I called my parents back in Jersey to make sure they were watching, and told my dad I'd call back after the inning.  Freese chased the changeup, and I called my dad.  Then I called my girlfriend.  Then I logged onto Twitter, the Mets official site, several blogs, and just soaked it all in.
Bryan:
To me, the no-hitter signals a giant monkey off the back of the entire franchise.  It was such a stigma and such a burden for the entire organization to carry around with it, and with no certainty that it would ever happen.  Now all of that's gone, and in a way it's such a relief to the owners, front office, players, and especially the fan base.  I also think that it really cements Johan's place in Mets history.  Sadly he hasn't been a part of a whole lot of team success while with the Mets that we'll be able to look back on and think about him being at the forefront of, and while there's plenty of time for that to come, if it doesn't he will always be remembered fondly by Mets fans for this.  I really think in the end it will justify the trade and justify the big contract no matter what happens from here on out.  It helps that he's a class act, but it definitely ensures his spot among Mets pitching royalty.I watched pretty much the entire game at home.  Around the 4th or 5th inning I first noticed a 0 in the hit column, which was a little surprising since there had been plenty of base runners due to walks.  I thought the Baxter catch was a sure sign that something special was about to happen and this would be the night (although I thought the same in '06 after Endy's catch and they did not win that game).  No matter what they said on the broadcast, I knew all along that there was no way Johan would come out of the game until he gave up a hit.  For the final inning I was a little on edge, as if they had a 1-run lead in a playoff game, and I let out one big loud clap for each of the first two outs, since both were just a tad harder than routine plays.  Then when Freeze struck out I threw my arms in the air and let out a big sigh of relief.  Post game I kind of had a similar thought to Gary in that I was really interested in hearing Howie's call.  You could also clearly tell, as Keith pointed out, that Gary was really emotional.  Also, Ron was pretty speechless and at the same time thrilled, while trying to collect his thoughts.  One thing that I noticed that I haven't heard talked about, although it probably has been somewhere, is the guy in the Carter jersey joining in the celebration until security tackled him.  In a weird way, it made me remember Gary at such an important moment in Mets history, and while it's wrong to condone fans running onto the field, that guy should be commended in a way for joining in the celebration.
Spencer:
To me, the no-hitter signals a giant monkey off the back of the entire franchise.  It was such a stigma and such a burden for the entire organization to carry around with it, and with no certainty that it would ever happen.  Now all of that's gone, and in a way it's such a relief to the owners, front office, players, and especially the fan base.  I also think that it really cements Johan's place in Mets history.  Sadly he hasn't been a part of a whole lot of team success while with the Mets that we'll be able to look back on and think about him being at the forefront of, and while there's plenty of time for that to come, if it doesn't he will always be remembered fondly by Mets fans for this.  I really think in the end it will justify the trade and justify the big contract no matter what happens from here on out.  It helps that he's a class act, but it definitely ensures his spot among Mets pitching royalty.I watched pretty much the entire game at home.  Around the 4th or 5th inning I first noticed a 0 in the hit column, which was a little surprising since there had been plenty of base runners due to walks.  I thought the Baxter catch was a sure sign that something special was about to happen and this would be the night (although I thought the same in '06 after Endy's catch and they did not win that game).  No matter what they said on the broadcast, I knew all along that there was no way Johan would come out of the game until he gave up a hit.  For the final inning I was a little on edge, as if they had a 1-run lead in a playoff game, and I let out one big loud clap for each of the first two outs, since both were just a tad harder than routine plays.  Then when Freeze struck out I threw my arms in the air and let out a big sigh of relief.  Post game I kind of had a similar thought to Gary in that I was really interested in hearing Howie's call.  You could also clearly tell, as Keith pointed out, that Gary was really emotional.  Also, Ron was pretty speechless and at the same time thrilled, while trying to collect his thoughts.  One thing that I noticed that I haven't heard talked about, although it probably has been somewhere, is the guy in the Carter jersey joining in the celebration until security tackled him.  In a weird way, it made me remember Gary at such an important moment in Mets history, and while it's wrong to condone fans running onto the field, that guy should be commended in a way for joining in the celebration.
Gonzo Will:
I see it as something that I was glad to witness.  As a Met fan, I want to see certain things....another championship for sure.  But as a baseball fan, there are some events that I would love to see in my lifetime.  For instance, I loved it when the Boston Red Sox not only beat the Yankees for the Pennant, but won the World Series-twice!  I also liked it when the Chicago White Sox break their curse as well.I think the next thing that I would really like to see would be a Cubs World Championship.As for the Mets, I think this was a huge milestone....especially for the fans.Where was I?  I was listening to the game while I did some work around the house and than sat in the living room and watched it live....I stood in front of the TV for the last six outs.I also watched every interview.
Connor:
To me, this is a symbolic turning point in the history of the franchise. We've finally gotten the monkey off our backs. Also, the no-hitter is something that can teach us to believe that something good can actually come out of being a Mets fan.As for where I was: I was sitting on the couch, watching the game with my dad.
My. North Jersey:
It means not having to see the counter after the 1st hit given up in a game of eight thousand and forever followed by the not tonight phrase. It means finally having another Mets 1st. The 1st truly special Citi Field memory.Where was I when the final out was recorded?I was hanging out in the RDM Dugout while watching it on MLB.com and listening to it on WFAN along with my wife (who didn't come to watch until one out remained for fear of jinxing it) and my kids.
Kingman26:
To me, the no-hitter was absolutely incredible and I am so glad I got to watch it. As a 45-year-old serious fan since the early ‘70s, I admit that I think about no-hitters almost every game. I never thought I would see a Mets one; when I am travelling and cannot watch and check finals on my Blackberry, I often have slight moments of anxiety wondering if I missed the first Mets no-hitter. I watched Jack Morris no-hit the White Sox when in high school and I was at a game when El Sid had 5 no-hit innings and twisted his ankle or something and had to come out. I vividly remember Maine and Glavine’s near-misses. So after the 7th, it took on a surreal and unparalleled intensity. I just did not think it was going to happen. I did not think Collins would take out Johan, I just thought someone would blast a clean single in the 9th. It means, to me, a huge monkey off of the team’s back, and frankly, Johan was the guy to do it, as while some so-so pitchers achieve this (hi Phil Humber!) often superstar pitchers have at least one no-no in their resume. Hopefully it also means a lot to Johan as he continues to regain form in a surprisingly fine fashion. I think it also served to bring this close-knit team even closer together, as you could literally feel the intensity, even on TV, in the 9th inning, and the amazing vibe after the game. I was home Friday night, catching up on some work and doing some cleaning in anticipation of some visiting friends this week, and had the game on, but after the 6th, I stopped other activities when the Cards were batting, toasted each Johan out with a sip of bourbon, and was enjoying this game—and following it as closely or more so—that any regular season game I can ever remember. The 9th was unreal—almost TOO intense. Every pitch was so huge. It reminded me of the 10th inning of Game 6 in 1986—SO much meaning riding on every pitch. When it finally ended it was bliss—I did not want it to end and kept the postgame on for over 2 hours. A truly remarkable, historic, and tremendously enjoyable Met moment, and one which reaffirmed for me the beauty of baseball and being a loyal fan of one team, through thick and thin, for your whole life.
TRS86:
Great question...I signifies hopefully an end to the black cloud that has hung over the Mets since the collapse.   An end to that era of waiting for the other shoe to drop and the beginning of a team that we can be proud of long term where You Gotta Believe means something again.On a side note this tream feels more like a close knit family than any Mets team I have seen since the early 2000's.  To me a testament to Terry, David and guys like Johan as well.As for where I was... enjoying an incredible moment with my wonderful wife and beautiful daughter who put up with my Met obsession and have became big fans in their own right.
Thanks for the great responses everybody.