As we have gone through our top prospects list, it has been fairly easy to separate the prospects into two distinct categories: players with a high degree of polish to their games (think Vaughn or Nieuwenhuis), and players with tremendous raw ability that have yet to really put it all together (Rodriguez, Familia). Every system has guys like these in abundance, but they are not exactly what you’d call blue-chippers until you combine the two categories. Thankfully, we’ve gotten to that point in the list with number 5, Reese Havens.Havens is the type of player you count your lucky stars was never traded. Drafted out of the University of South Carolina in first round of the same 2008 draft that brought us Ike Davis, Brad Holt and Captain Kirk, Havens is a hard-hitting, second baseman whose only recent struggles have been almost entirely due to injury. He played nearly 100 games in 2009 in Port St. Lucie, putting up less than stellar numbers (.247 average, albeit with a very solid .361 OBP redeeming himself slightly, and slugging just .422), but when he was healthy last year, he raked. Small sample size be damned, Havens hit 9 home runs in 32 games between St. Lucie and Binghamton, with his more impressive numbers coming, surprisingly enough, in AA. In 18 games with the B-Mets Havens hit.338 with a .662 slugging percentage. We can’t get too hung up on those numbers, but they should make Mets fans very excited about the kids ability to hit the baseball, and with authority.So Havens has the bat to hit for power and average, and there hasn’t been that much said about his fielding abilities, but suffice it to say he would be an improvement over Daniel Murphy. The biggest question that remains is whether he can stay healthy.  The good news is that the chronic oblique injuries Havens had faced over the season may very well be cured after rib surgery this winter (http://proxy.espn.go.com/blog/new-york/mets/post/_/id/14353/havens-feels-right-after-rib-surgery), but until he puts together a full season at the higher levels of the minors, Havens will remain somewhat of an unknown quantity. That said, our rivals down the turnpike have shown just what an asset a second baseman who can actually hit from the left side of the plate can be, so Havens’ progress should be monitored with baited breath by Mets fans looking to finally shore up the second half of our double play combo.